The Sculptures

The centrepiece of the Memorial is two large bronze sculptures, representing loss and sacrifice, on either side of a central bronze laurel wreath. Created by Ian Rank-Broadley, the sculptures bear silent witness to the cost of armed conflict.

Two large bronze sculptures form the centrepiece of the Memorial. These represent loss and sacrifice and stand on either side of a bronze laurel wreath.

To the north, a Serviceman is raised aloft on a stretcher by comrades. On either side family members look on - a mother clasped by a child and an older couple clutching each other in anguish. It bears witness to the cost of armed conflict to those left behind - the families, loved ones and friends who live with the pain and consequence of their loss for the rest of their lives.

Opposite, the body of a warrior is being prepared for burial by female and Gurkha soldiers. The figure before the double doors points to a world beyond where the warrior will rest as another figure chisels the name on the memorial.

The alignment and axis of the Memorial portray a greater meaning and draws inspiration from prehistoric monuments. At the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month the sun's rays stream through the door of the sculpture, illuminating the wreath in the centre of the Memorial.

Created by Ian Rank-Broadley, Ian is best known for his representation of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II which has appeared on all UK and Commonwealth coinage since 1998.

 

Sculpture detail